EDArduino nano arduino compatible2
EDArduino nano arduino compatibleEDArduino nano arduino compatible2

Arduino-Compatible Nano 3.0 EDArduino (Atmega 328)

5.00 out of 5
(2 customer reviews)

$8.00

SKU: DAR1022. Category: . Tags: , , .

Product Description

Specifications:

  • Microcontroller:ATmega328
  • Operating Voltage (logic level): 5 V
  • Input Voltage (recommended): 7-12 V
  • Input Voltage (limits): 6-20 V
  • Digital I/O Pins: 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins: 8
  • DC Current per I/O Pin: 40 mA
  • Flash Memory: 16 KB (ATmega168) or 32 KB (ATmega328) of which 2 KB used by bootloader
  • SRAM: 1 KB (ATmega168) or 2 KB (ATmega328)
  • EEPROM: 512 bytes (ATmega168) or 1 KB (ATmega328)
  • Clock Speed: 16 MHz
  • Dimensions: 0.73″ x 1.70″
  • Genius FT232RL, win7, win8 supported well

Power:

The EDArduino Nano can be powered via the Mini-B USB connection, 6-20V unregulated external power supply (pin 30), or 5V regulated external power supply (pin 27). The power source is automatically selected to the highest voltage source.
The FTDI FT232RL chip on the Nano is only powered if the board is being powered over USB. As a result, when running on external (non-USB) power, the 3.3V output (which is supplied by the FTDI chip) is not available and the RX and TX LEDs will flicker if digital pins 0 or 1 are high.

Memory

The ATmega168 has 32 KB of flash memory for storing code (of which 2 KB is used for the bootloader); the ATmega328 has 32 KB, (also with 2 KB used for the bootloader). The ATmega328 has 1 KB of SRAM and 512 bytes of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the EEPROM library); the ATmega328 has 2 KB of SRAM and 1 KB of EEPROM.

Input and Output

Each of the 14 digital pins on the Nano can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:
Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data. These pins are connected to the corresponding pins of the FTDI USB-to-TTL Serial chip.

  • External Interrupts: 2 and 3. These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the attachInterrupt() function for details.
  • PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11. Provide 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite() function.

SPI: 10 (SS), 11 (MOSI), 12 (MISO), 13 (SCK). These pins support SPI communication, which, although provided by the underlying hardware, is not currently included in the Arduino language.

  • LED: 13. There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it’s off.

The Nano has 8 analog inputs, each of which provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default they measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the analogReference() function. Additionally, some pins have specialized functionality:

  • I2C: 4 (SDA) and 5 (SCL). Support I2C (TWI) communication using the Wire library (documentation on the Wiring website).

There are a couple of other pins on the board:

  • AREF. Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with analogReference().
  • Reset. Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board.

See also the mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega168 ports.

Communication

The EDArduino Nano has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another EDArduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega328 provide UART TTL (5V) serial communication, which is available on digital pins 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). An FTDI FT232RL on the board channels this serial communication over USB and the FTDI drivers (included with the EDArduino software) provide a virtual com port to software on the computer. The EDArduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the EDArduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the FTDI chip and USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1).
A SoftwareSerial library allows for serial communication on any of the Nano’s digital pins.
ATmega328 also support I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus; see the documentation for details. To use the SPI communication, please see the ATmega328 datasheet.

Programming

The EDArduino Nano can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). Select “Arduino Diecimila, Duemilanove, or Nano w/ ATmega328″ or “Arduino Duemilanove or Nano w/ ATmega328″ from the Tools > Board menu (according to the microcontroller on your board). For details, see the reference and tutorials.
ATmega328 on the EDArduino Nano comes preburned with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the original STK500 protocol (reference, C header files).
You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see these instructions for details.

Automatic (Software) Reset

Rather then requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the EDArduino Nano is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. One of the hardware flow control lines (DTR) of the FT232RL is connected to the reset line of the ATmega168 or ATmega328 via a 100 nanofarad capacitor. When this line is asserted (taken low), the reset line drops long enough to reset the chip. The Arduino software uses this capability to allow you to upload code by simply pressing the upload button in the EDArduino environment. This means that the bootloader can have a shorter timeout, as the lowering of DTR can be well-coordinated with the start of the upload.
This setup has other implications. When the Nano is connected to either a computer running Mac OS X or Linux, it resets each time a connection is made to it from software (via USB). For the following half-second or so, the bootloader is running on the Nano. While it is programmed to ignore malformed data (i.e. anything besides an upload of new code), it will intercept the first few bytes of data sent to the board after a connection is opened. If a sketch running on the board receives one-time configuration or other data when it first starts, make sure that the software with which it communicates waits a second after opening the connection and before sending this data.

Package:

  • 1 pcs of Arduino Nano
  • 1 pcs of mini USB cable

EDArduino SoftwareDownload : http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Software

For Schematic, board files, please refer to arduino designs: http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardNano

This is the highest quality Arduino-compatible product made in China, you try and you will like!

Additional Information

Weight 0.045 kg

2 reviews for Arduino-Compatible Nano 3.0 EDArduino (Atmega 328)

  1. (verified owner):

    Love this board, using it for a mini bi-ped robot and can’t wait to get mine! Thank you to electrodragon for making it so cheap

  2. 5 out of 5

    (verified owner):

    So cool and easy to use. I ran into a hitch when trying to use these as an ISP. I’d load the “Arduino ISP” sketch and wire it up as shown in many of the tutorials. But avrdude kept giving me “not in sync” errors. After hunting around on the net I ran into a guy who said to put a 100 pico farad cap between the reset and 5v to prevent a reset during ISP commands (after you’ve loaded the “Arduino ISP” sketch of course). I didn’t test this, but had a pro mini and realized that disconnecting the DTR – reset line would accomplish the same thing. Sure enough, if DTR – reset are connected I got the same error. Once I broke this connection it worked like a champ.

  3. 5 out of 5

    (verified owner):

    Parfait, perfect! Voici un truc utile a savoir:
    Cette carte permet d’obtenir une concentration très interessante pour les projets de petites taille.
    Mais la taille memoire est plus limitée! Cependant il y a un cas ou elle peut être optimisée grandement quand on utilise beaucoup de chaine de caractere, exemple: quand on utilise la fonction Serial.print(“ici du texte”); et qu’on la remplace par
    Seial.print(“F(“ici mon texte”));
    La memoire est libérée d’un facteur 2!

Add a review

Product Enquiry